Archive for December, 2007

Wishing you a prosperous 2008

Wishing you and all your family members all the very best and a prosperous 2008

Wishing you and all your family members all the very best and a prosperous 2008

Wishing you and all your family members all the very best and a prosperous 2008

Wishing you and all your family members all the very best and a prosperous 2008

 

Indian Muslim’s dilemma

Indian Muslim’s dilemma 

 Ather Farouqui

     Following cataclysmic events such as 9/11 and the Iraq invasion that followed, the questions facing Muslims globally face Muslims in India as well. Of course, some of these questions are justified. They are relevant from the point of view of a fast-changing world where many in a community are blamed for being static, backward-looking and atavistic. 

      But many of the questions being raised are also stereotypical in that they seek to straitjacket Muslims everywhere regardless of their variegated conditioning. In the process, even those Muslims who have done nothing to deserve the epithet of being backward-looking are stigmatised; the fact that they might be as normal as others in the common civic space is ignored.

        Being Muslim in today’s world often means carrying a special burden of suspicion and prejudice on the one hand and social, political and religious conservatism on the other. The ordinary Muslim is caught between the increasingly stringent anti-Muslim propaganda of the West and equally strident religious fervour of the jehadi Muslims wherever they exist in the Islamic world. 

        Both sides are pushing ordinary Muslims towards making a clear choice between being either anti-Muslim or projehadi. However, this is not a choice every Muslim wants to make. Many Muslims want to maintain the religious identity of their birth without being part of its fringe extremist elements. To these Muslims, religion is private and truth is divisible.

        After the advent of Islam in India and until the time of British conquest, Muslims were the ruling community in the subcontinent. However, through conversion and inter-marriages, Islam did not remain confined to the upper echelons of society and permeated every aspect of Indian life and culture. The British conquest resulted in a cultural upheaval among the Hindus, which was termed a renaissance in Bengal. It, however, failed to create a change in the Muslim psyche.

     The Indian Muslim, in addition to this recent burden, has had to carry the baggage of the very complex process of partition and its aftermath where he is seen as a suspect by civil society.

         Of course, it doesn’t help his cause that various contemporary Muslim groups subscribe to violence and advocate militant Islam one way or the other. What is more alarming is that they are finding a growing constituency of adherents and supporters. Ironically, no one can define the Islamic culture for which these Muslims are supposedly fighting. 

        This ideology, besides being obviously destructive and suicidal, has plenty of contradictions. It aims at destruction, carnage and upheaval in the modern world. These Muslims want to destroy the modern, civilised world, to the development of which they have contributed little while enjoying all its comforts.
   However, there has never been one model of Islam even in the past and certainly not in the modern pluralistic world. It’s difficult to imagine that these militant Islamic groups are advocating a world compatible with a desert culture of 1,400 years ago. Even in those times Islam was already divided, the concomitant intrigues and hatreds leading to the murder of three caliphs out of four after Prophet Mohammad! 

        Thus, the entire cause of Muslim antagonism against all other groups, religious, cultural and social, might be said to be ideological confusion among various sects of Muslims and unresolved contradictions and conflicts within Muslim society from the very time of the advent of Islam. It is apparent that no exclusivist culture, especially the ‘Muslim’ culture dreamt up by Islamists, would be able to survive in the free market economy that dictates contemporary geopolitics. This economy is completely in the hands of Jews and Christians against whom Muslims have declared a war without having prepared themselves for this cultural conflict.

        Besides, Muslims are also participating in and enjoying every kind of global activity and comfort — social, cultural, economic, both IT- and diaspora-driven. Thus, the quest for an exclusive Muslim society or culture with supposedly Islamic characteristics defies all logic.

     The entire civilised, cultured, affluent and educated world is in the hands of those whom militant Muslims consider their enemies and they have nothing practical to offer as an alternative to the things they want to destroy.

   The writer is a political commentator .

 

Religious Riots : Underlying Causes

Hindus should ask why people convert  

        The outbreak of communal violence in Orissa has disturbing implications. The state, with a 22 per cent tribal population, has been largely peaceful since the gruesome murder of Graham Staines, a Christian missionary, and his two children in 1999. As in the case of the Staines’s murder, Hindu fundamentalists were held responsible for triggering unrest during the Christmas season.

     The violence was one-sided in the past, but no longer. There is resistance on the part of Christian groups to acts of vandalism, including destruction of churches, allegedly by the Vishwa Hindu Parishad and other sangh parivar groups. The government should ensure that fundamentalists, irrespective of their faith, do not disrupt law and order.

   At the root of the trouble is competition among various religious and political groups to convert tribals to their cause.

     The issue is not limited to Orissa. It is alive in the tribal areas of Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand. A struggle is on to reap a harvest of tribal souls. Christian missionaries were the first to arrive, followed by sangh parivar outfits like Vanvasi Kalyan Ashram.

     Maoists are the latest force in the region. Each of these groups wants adivasis to convert to its belief. Their task has been made easier by the government’s misplaced tribal policy that sought to protect tribal culture and lifestyle from modern establishments, including schools and hospitals. The church became a much-needed substitute for the state, building schools, colleges and hospitals. Hindu missionary activity, with political undertones, is also devised along similar lines.

     These ‘missionaries’ have stepped into a vacuum created by the government.


         The Constitution guarantees the freedom to convert and be converted, even though some states, including Orissa, have enacted laws to regulate religious conversion. However, Hindu groups which constantly seek a ban on conversions rarely ask why they happen in the first place. Is it because Christian missionaries offer material inducements to tribals as the VHP and other similar groups claim? Or, is it more than that?
        The biggest inducement to convert, particularly for tribals and Dalits, seems to be the promise of self-respect. It is not surprising that religious conversion takes place mostly among tribals and Dalits. A change of faith promises a reprieve for these people from a still oppressive caste system.

     Conversions have always been a powerful instrument of dissent from religious institutions that refuse to be inclusive and accommodative. The way forward is for these institutions to introspect and change.

 

Religious Riots: Orissa

     Violence in the name of religion  can have  no place in this country. India cannot and should not turn into a Nazi Germany, Pakistan or Arabistan.

    Religious riots must be controlled with utmost severity. Reasons for the riots must be enquired into impartially. It is understood that the root cause was the demand of converted Christians to be declared as SCs/STs.

    Demand for Relegation to backward castes has been the bane of our populist democracy. Politicians have been dividing the people into castes and more castes for votes. This must stop immediately.      

      I N ORISSA, Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik has ordered a judicial inquiry into the violence against Christian institutions. At the same time State Minister of Steel and Mines, Padmanabha Behera, has resigned owning “moral responsibility” for the Christmas carnage.      These actions were taken after a curfew and after the presence of paramilitary forces proved to be no deterrents to the criminal elements who continued on their hate campaign. The minister’s resignation was one of the demands of the tribals in the district, who were opposing a proposal to grant Dalits the status of a Scheduled Caste. This hadn’t much to do with the attacks directly. So, the issuance of caveats by all parties to not “make this a political issue” rings hollow.

     If this is not politics, nothing is. The state response leaves much to be desired.

    The matter-of-fact acceptance that the attacks were likely in response to an assault on a VHP leader is shameful and tiring. As there had already been an attack on an ‘anti-conversion’ activist, which in turn had inspired the VHP to call a bandh, surely the state machinery should have been alerted to the possibility of such a ‘response’? C

     ommunal vandalism and violence have been played out with almost meticulous precision. It is incomprehensible how 15 churches and in stitutes were targeted while there was no intelligence on the ground about any such activity Or did the state machinery . simply not bother?

     Communal tension has festered in Orissa for years. One of its worst manifestations was the 1999 Graham Staines case, where the Australian missionary was burnt to death along with his two young sons.

     While the murders shocked the nation, the case ended finally with a judgment that exposed the wide chasm between a deterring penalty and the ground realities. While the lower court sentenced the main perpetrator, Dara Singh, to death and 12 others to life imprisonment in September 2003, the Orissa High Court ended up commuting Singh’s death to life sentence and acquitted 11 of the others. The gap in the severity of the penalty , slashed to mere tokenism, cannot have sent the right signals to those inciting such hate crimes.

     And clearly little has , been done to address the basic welfare issues involved in such communal divides. This is a politically-motivated crime and the upkeep of law and order is an issue that the state machinery alone can address.

     Yet, the moves have been tactical and little is yet being done to grapple with the ground reality that Orissa may be becoming a cesspit of intolerance.

     The rot must be stemmed now, Mr Patnaik’s reassurances notwithstanding.

 

India in Danger: Pak Nuclear Arsenal and Terrorists

Pakistan is caught in a downward spiral of terrorism and violence.

     Worse, it has no worthwhile institution that inspires confidence. Its Legislatures are but empty wind bags, its political parties are in complete disarray. The judiciary which was trying to stand up has been buried up to the neck.

      The Army and the ISI which have been running the country are themselves contaminated with extremists. Attacks on Gen Musharraf have been initiated by members of armed forces.  The ISI which at last estimate has been making around 3 billion US$ every year from narcotics is a Frankestien Monster, subject to no legitimate body. 

     The Army and the ISI have made no secret of their having nuclear weapons or inclination to use them.  Since both are enmeshed in relationship with extremist elements, it is only a matter of time, before they fall into the hands of terrorists. 

     Remember, Even Russia had many such wepons. However when the USSR broke up they managed with US & Nato help to get hold of and neutralise wepons and missiles in the seceding states. Pakistan, which  has kept the locations  atomic wepons secret and appears to have very loose control over its own personnell, poses a grave threat to not only to South Asia but to all humanity. 

     US which has been aware of the proliferation by Pakistan has never discouraged it. In fact its turning a blind eye to the nefarious activities of AQ Khan and Co, and the Pakistani establishment is responsible for the  present state of affairs. Should the weapons fall in to the hands of Al Quaida or any of its subsideries, US will be the prime target.  

     Should the terrorists find it a difficult targer, Europe Israel would be the next alternate targets.  

     India , a soft state, has been  the testing ground for all tactics and proving operations of terrorists, is running the greatest danger from the nuclear arsenal of Pakistan.

Colrama

   

NOTHING WORRIES the world more than the combination of Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal, its political instability and its past record of proliferation.

     More than the assassination of Benazir Bhutto, however, it has been recent evidence of jihadi infiltration of the Pakistani military that have resurrected fears of an “atomic Taliban” scenario.

     There is a clear divide over how to handle Pakistan’s nuclear problem. Non-proliferation and counter-terrorism experts argue nothing is more important than securing Pakistan’s arsenal. This means putting one’s eggs in the military basket and backing dictators like Pervez Musharraf to the hilt.

     Former head of arms control in the US State Department, John Bolton, once said the general “is the best bet to secure the nuclear arsenal”. Others argue nuclear safety is best assured by political stability. And stability means a democratic government.

     “Pakistan’s arsenal is worth worrying about. But that doesn’t necessarily lead to the conclusion that you have to build policy around a military strongman. Moving toward political legitimacy is a strong protection,” says Teresita Schaffer, South Asia expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

     This thesis has been supported by a recent study of A.Q. Khan’s nuclear black market operations by the International Institute for Strategic Studies and a book, The Nuclear Jihadist, by Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins. Both conclude the fragmented nature of Pakistan’s polity allowed Khan to sell nuclear secrets freely.

     “The diffusion of domestic political power among the troika of the President, Prime Minister and the Army Chief, obscured the command and control authority over the covert nuclear weapons programme,” says the IISS report.

     The Pakistani military alternate between warning of a Taliban takeover and assuring the world that its estimated 50 nuclear warheads are safe. Raising the latter fear buttresses support for the military in Washington. Says Frederic Grare, Pakistan analyst at Carnegie Endowment: “The military always use the nuclear bogey as leverage against the US.

     ” On the other hand, several reports have said the US maintains contingency plans for either bombing or capturing Pakistan’s half-a-dozen nuclear installations in case the country looks like it is losing control of its arsenal.

     References to military cooperation with India in handling “third countries” losing control of their nuclear bombs in the Pentagon’s Quadrennial Defence Review indicate New Delhi would have a role in such a contingency plan. Says Stephen Cohen of the Brookings Institute and author of The Idea of Pakistan: “Pakistanis fear a US or Indian attack on their arsenal.” While most analysts say Pakistan’s arsenal is in no specific danger from the present turmoil, the larger concern is that the lack of a legitimate government feeds into a broader political crisis in Pakistan – one that is infecting the professionalism of the military as well.

     The Pakistani military’s operations in the Northwest Frontier Province against Islamic in surgents have seen record levels of court martials and desertions. Former RAW Pakistan analyst B. Raman recently noted that the suicide bomber who had attacked the ISI headquarters had a password only given to brigadier-level officers.

     The evidence of Islamist support within the military is strong, notes counter-terrorism expert Daveed Gartenstein-Ross. “At least three of the attempts on Musharraf ‘s life were inside jobs.”     

     Islamabad has officially admitted that two times in the past six years, its nuclear scientists passed on sensitive data to outsiders, including once in 2001 to Osama himself. US intelligence keeps a close watch on evidence of separate centres of power arising within the Pakistan military and intelligence apparatus. That is seen as a warning sign.

      They are less concerned about mobs on the street or political assassinations. “Pakistan’s record is world-class bad,” says Cohen.

     He notes that Russia cooperated with the West in securing its “loose nukes” problem. Pakistan is less helpful. Though it accepted US nuclear safety technology and training, Islamabad sent its personnel to the US rather than allow US officials to know the location of its nuclear installations.

     Even now, US officials say they are not sure if they know the whereabouts of all of Pakistan’s nuclear sites.

pchaudhuri@hindustantimes.com

 

NRIs: Two shot dead in Richmond California

     TWO SIKH brothers from Patiala's Model Town were shot dead in their restaurant in Richmond, California, on Thursday but the motive was not immediately clear.

      Their family and the Sikh community in Richmond suspect that Ravinder Kalsi (40) and his younger brother Paramjit Kalsi (30) were victims of mistaken identities as the two gunmen neither committed theft nor did the victims have any personal enmity with anyone. According to reports, the killing took place around 9 p.m. (local time) on Thursday night when there were no customers in the brothers' Sahib Indian restaurant.

     Ravinder reportedly answered a knock on the door just after the restaurant closed for the day. A report said he was shot dead in the doorway itself. “The killers touched nothing, said nothing. They found Paramjit in the kitchen and shot him dead too,” the report in a US-based daily said. The police found one of them dead and the other was airlifted to an area hospital where he died later .

     The Richmond police confirmed that there was no robbery and the only motive seemed to be murder Reports said the police had taken CCTV footage and were looking for witnesses.

     Talking to HT in Patiala, a brother of the victims, Harinder Singh, said the restaurant manager had conveyed the news to them on Thursday “The manager told us that she saved herself by hiding under the counter when the gunmen shot them dead,” he said.

     “They were doing their business sincerely What was their mistake?” asked Harinder Ravinder and Paramjit were both green card holders and had worked hard to set up the restaurant after they moved to the US about a decade ago, he said, adding they also had a real estate busines

     s. The family was in a state of shock and their mother Gurbachan Kaur was inconsolable. The brothers are among nine siblings and had done their schooling from Patiala's Government Multipurpose School. When contacted, SGPC president Avtar Singh Makkar said he would take up the issue with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and the American Embassy “I will seek an inquiry into the incident.

      It has to be seen whether this is a case of mistaken identities (post-9/11) or of racial hatred,” he added. Divisional Commissioner S.K. Ahluwalia has assured all help to the family MISTAKEN IDENTITY? 

      The victims' family and the Sikh community in Richmond suspect that Ravinder and his younger brother Paramjit were victims of mistaken identities as the two gunmen neither committed theft nor did the victims have any personal onmity with anyone a Reports said the police had taken CCTV footage and were looking for witnesses.

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Rotary: Poster Painting: Participation

rotary-poster-pntg-251207.jpgrotary-poster-pntg6-251207.jpgrotary-poster-pntg-1-251207.jpgrotary-poster-pntg-3-251207.jpg

Rotary South West Delhi held a Poster Painting competetion on 25 Dec.

Over 600 chidren took part in the competetion.

Special thanks are due to Mr Pankaj Agarwal, Mr Watwani, Mr Subhash Dewan for inviting our under privilaged children. Thanks to Rahul Dewan for running till last minute collecting boards.

Furkan Pathan, Lakshman Ahirwar and Suraj Lal all aged 13 , from our classes also took part.

It was a bright and sunny day, children were in colorful dresses. They had an opportunity for an outing, chance to paint to hearts content. Every child also got three coupons to be exchanged for snacks or soft drinks. There was a lot of choice for eats too. Children had a good time.

Rotarians sure can organise well.

 

Benazir Bhutto : Comments : A balanced view

Was she a credible hope for Pakistan?

     BENAZIR Bhutto’s killing will send shockwaves in political circles in India. She was a frequent visitor here in recent years and had a clutch of friends and admirers in our country. As a woman, well-educated and articulate at that, she elicited and enjoyed extra consideration. However, many did not forget her overcharged rhetoric over Kashmir in the Nineties and her dubious role in promoting the Taliban in Afghanistan. So, there was mistrust of her. They were not persuaded that passing years had increased her quotient of reliability. Did we believe she was a credible hope for restoration of democracy in Pakistan? Hardly likely.Her latest foray into Pakistan politics damaged further her political credibility and democratic credentials as she appeared very opportunistic. Perhaps it is with opportunism and with conviction and principles that politics in Pakistan is possible.

When Benazir’s triumphant return to Pakistan a few weeks ago was scarred by a terrible terrorist attack and she survived, one could have well speculated: for how long? Could any security arrangement for her have been foolproof, especially as she suspected some former military figures and ISI operatives of having been in league with her would-be assassins? How could she have believed that she could do democratic electioneering, mobilise the public and address rallies, without exposing herself to suicide attacks?

      If she were the head of state or government and was protected by the vast security apparatus of the State, she could have hoped to conduct her election campaign without mortal danger, but could she have as the controversial leader of opposition? Tragic though her killing is, it was a tragedy in-waiting.

Benazir misjudged the situation in Pakistan. She felt she could return to her country, fight an election under theBENAZIR Bhutto’s killing will send shockwaves in political circles in India. She was a frequent visitor here in recent years and had a clutch of friends and admirers in our country. As a woman, well-educated and articulate at that, she elicited and enjoyed extra consideration.

However, many did not forget her overcharged rhetoric over Kashmir in the Nineties and her dubious role in promoting the Taliban in Afghanistan. So, there was mistrust of her. They were not persuaded that passing years had increased her quotient of reliability. Did we believe she was a credible hope for restoration of democracy in Pakistan? Hardly likely.

Her latest foray into Pakistan politics damaged further her political credibility and democratic credentials as she appeared very opportunistic. Perhaps it is with opportunism and with conviction and principles that politics in Pakistan is possible.

When Benazir’s triumphant return to Pakistan a few weeks ago was scarred by a terrible terrorist attack and she survived, one could have well speculated: for how long? Could any security arrangement for her have been foolproof, especially as she suspected some former military figures and ISI operatives of having been in league with her would-be assassins? How could she have believed that she could do democratic electioneering, mobilise the public and address rallies, without exposing herself to suicide attacks? If she were the head of state or government and was protected by the vast security apparatus of the State, she could have hoped to conduct her election campaign without mortal danger, but could she have as the controversial leader of opposition? Tragic though her killing is, it was a tragedy in-waiting.

Benazir misjudged the situation in Pakistan. She felt she could return to her country, fight an election under the tutelage of a military regime, win and become prime minister, with General Pervez Musharraf as president. This despite the fact that she had railed against the military in Pakistan andBENAZIR Bhutto’s killing will send shockwaves in political circles in India. She was a frequent visitor here in recent years and had a clutch of friends and admirers in our country. As a woman, well-educated and articulate at that, she elicited and enjoyed extra consideration.

However, many did not forget her overcharged rhetoric over Kashmir in the Nineties and her dubious role in promoting the Taliban in Afghanistan. So, there was mistrust of her. They were not persuaded that passing years had increased her quotient of reliability. Did we believe she was a credible hope for restoration of democracy in Pakistan? Hardly likely.

Her latest foray into Pakistan politics damaged further her political credibility and democratic credentials as she appeared very opportunistic. Perhaps it is with opportunism and with conviction and principles that politics in Pakistan is possible.

When Benazir’s triumphant return to Pakistan a few weeks ago was scarred by a terrible terrorist attack and she survived, one could have well speculated: for how long? Could any security arrangement for her have been foolproof, especially as she suspected some former military figures and ISI operatives of having been in league with her would-be assassins? How could she have believed that she could do democratic electioneering, mobilise the public and address rallies, without exposing herself to suicide attacks? If sBENAZIR Bhutto’s killing will send shockwaves in political circles in India. She was a frequent visitor here in recent years and had a clutch of friends and admirers in our country. As a woman, well-educated and articulate at that, she elicited and enjoyed extra consideration.

However, many did not forget her overcharged rhetoric over Kashmir in the Nineties and her dubious role in promoting the Taliban in Afghanistan. So, there was mistrust of her. They were not persuaded that passing years had increased her quotient of reliability. Did we believe she was a credible hope for restoration of democracy in Pakistan? Hardly likely.

Her latest foray into Pakistan politics damaged further her political credibility and democratic credentials as she appeared very opportunistic. Perhaps it is with opportunism and with conviction and principles that politics in Pakistan is possible.

When Benazir’s triumphant return to Pakistan a few weeks ago was scarred by a terrible terrorist attack and she survived, one could have well speculated: for how long? Could any security arrangement for her have been foolproof, especially as she suspected some former military figures and ISI operatives of having been in league with her would-be assassins? How could she have believed that she could do democratic electioneering, mobilise the public and address rallies, without exposing herself to suicide attacks?

 If she were the head of state or government and was protected by the vast security apparatus of the State, she could have hoped to conduct her election campaign without mortal danger, but could she have as the controversial leader of opposition? Tragic though her killing is, it was a tragedy in-waiting.

Benazir misjudged the situation in Pak

by

Kanwal Sibal

Mail Today 28 Dec 07

 

Pakistan : Protests over Bhutto’s Killing

      Conditions  are deteriorating in Pakistan. A wave of violence is bound to be unleashed in the next couple of days, The security forces will need to be on the hihest alert.  

 Leaders civil and military must retain composure for peace to return.

LAHORE, Dec 27: Paramilitary forces were alerted on Thursday night after spontaneous protests erupted almost in all parts of the country and violence claimed the lives of eight people in Karachi and Lahore after Benazir Bhutto’s assassination in Rawalpindi.

 Intense violence was reported from all parts of Sindh, especially Karachi and Larkana, Ms Bhutto’s hometownerupted almost in all parts of the country and violence claimed the lives of eight people in Karachi and Lahore after Benazir Bhutto’s assassination in Rawalpindi.  

Fear and chaos ruled Karachi after news spread about Ms Bhutto’s death.

The ensuing violence in the Sindh metropolis claimed at least five lives while more than 150 vehicles, some petrol pumps and a hospital were set ablaze. The city descended into anarchy as armed mobs came out in the streets, to be joined later by gangsters, holding up panicked people stuck in traffic jams on major roads.

The traffic came to a standstill after hundreds of thousands of people, anticipating violence, fled their offices and sought to reach their homes. Law-enforcers were nowhere to be seen.

As fearful citizens made calls to inquire about the safety of their friends and family and learn about the traffic situation, the telecommunications networks jammed because of overloading. This sparked off rumours, further fuelling panic and the sense of insecurity.

A mob attacked Shahdadkot police station and freed 30 under-trial prisoners from the judicial lockup. Sources said that attackers had also took away arms from the ‘Malkhana’ of the Muhktiarkar’s office. Protests and violence erupted in Lahore and most parts of Punjab. The civic life was completely paralysed as shops shut down and transporters and commuters took their vehicles off roads.

PPP activists, soon after the news, came out on roads and started shouting slogans against the government. They burnt tyres, vehicles, banners of PML-Q candidates, public transport, police vehicles, offices and houses of some PML-Q office-bearers and state buldings.

Protests were also reported from Rawalpindi, Islamabad, Muzaffarabad in Azad Kashmir and Multan.

 

Bhutto: Aftermath

The aftermath of Benazir’s assassination will reverberate for a long time.

It will affect not only Pakistan but also its relations with other countries, notably the USA. The US will allow President Musharraf some time and gauge if he can ride out the storm that is to erupt in the next few days.

     In case he manages to, he may be able to hold on for some more time. Knives will be out for Musharraf. However, they have been out before and he has managed to dodge them so far.

       The biggest strike was after 9/11, but the wily dictator managed to summersault more than once in the air and from being an ardent supporter of Taliban managed to convince the US that Pakistan has turned a new leaf. It was a valuable ally in the war against terrorism, of course only so long as he was at the helm of affairs. Will he be able to keep the unrest that is bound to be unleashed in the next few days? 

     He has been predicting chaos if the emergency was lifted. That he did so most reluctantly, after continuous admonishing from the US, and world pressure, is obvious.  He can very well say now ‘look I told you so’.

     He can now reimpose the emergency with few questions asked by external pressure groups. He can even have an election after six months or even immediately. 

     Even if the elections are staged, With Benazir gone and Nawaz out of the race the Prime Minister so thrown up will be a nobody. This will fit in well with his plan for a sham democracy for show casing, and all powers vested in himself.

      Of course, it will depend on Gen Kiyani, the COAS of Pakistan Army. He is the greatest beneficiary of the present circumstances.

     If history of Pakistan is anything to go by, Gen Kiyani  is in the shadows waiting for the drama to play out.

Musharraf must today be more scared of Gen Kiyani than any one else.